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JKnit - Knitting Project Assistant app

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JKnit Tutorials

Tutorial 4: More on Linked Events

by Julia Kroyan

In this latest tutorial, you will learn more about linked events. We will use the Slouchy Striped Hat pattern (download now) from Tutorial 1 and enter the instructions differently, this time taking full advantage of linked events. How often you will be using the linked event feature in other projects is a matter of individual preference, but it is certainly nice to have a variety of different options at one's disposal.

This tutorial uses the following conventions:

  • Pattern directions appear in blue italics.
  • JKnit project configuration settings are shown in blocks with a light blue background.
  • This tutorial describes project input on a mobile device (setup on the web portal is very similar).
  • I assume that you already know how to create a project in JKnit and add a project piece. If not, please first take a look at Tutorial 1 where I cover most of the basic functionality in JKnit. So, let's go ahead with inputting the pattern directions:

    Cast on 120 sts in color A and divide them evenly onto 4 DPNs (30 sts per needle). Join for working in the round. Place a stitch marker at the end of the round. You may want to switch to a circular needle if, at any point, you feel like there are too many sts on the DPNs.

    For the cast on, we can use the same event settings as in Tutorial 1:

    Event Type: Alert

    Start: Linked? OFF, Row 0

    Note: Cast on 120 sts in color A onto 4 DPNs, 30 sts per needle

    For the border, work in 1-by-1 ribs (K1, P1) for 2 inches (5 cm).

    The only difference from Tutorial 1 ill be in the event note. We still don't have to use the linked events though.

    Event Type: Alert

    Start: Linked? OFF, Row 1

    Note: Ribbing: k1, p1 for 2 in (5 cm)

    Occurrence Settings:

    Every Which Row? 1

    How Many Times? check the 'Unlimited' box

    Since we don't know in advance how many rows of ribbing we will knit, we make this event repeat indefinitely. The event note reminds us to continue the ribbing until we reach the desired height of 2 inches. At that point you will have to stop the event by going to its detailed view (tap on the event in the Events This Row list on the Counter screen). In detailed view mode, you can stop events that repeat indefinitely by pressing the Stop Unlim. Event button. The current row will be the last row for this event after which it will no longer appear in the Events This Row list.


    After finishing the brim, for the main part of the hat, knit all sts.

    We could input this event to start at a certain height, but it is actually more convenient to link it to the completion of the ribbing. This might sound unusual since, at the time of the setup, the event for the ribbing is set to repeat indefinitely. However, once you stop the ribbing event, JKnit will automatically check if there are any other events that are linked to the completion of the ribbing. This approach provides many advantages as it makes it easier to follow directions while knitting.

    To link an event to another event of the same piece, first turn the Linked? switch ON. Since we want to start the stockinette part in the next row after the ribbing, we enter 1 for In Which Row? and select the event with the note Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm) in the After Which Event? field. This is the complete input:

    Event Type: Alert

    Start: Linked? ON, In Which Row? 1, After Which Event? "Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm)"

    Note: K all sts

    Occurrence Settings:

    Every Which Row? 1

    How Many Times? check the 'Unlimited' box

    In the first row after the brim, evenly increase by 36 sts, which makes 156 sts on the needles.

    Again, we can link this event to the completion of the ribbing:

    Event Type: Increase

    Start: Linked? ON, In Which Row? 1, After Which Event? "Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm)"

    Note: [k4, M1, (k3, M1) 2x] 12x

    Occurrence & Inc. Settings:

    Every Which Row? 1

    How Many Times? 1

    # of Stitches: 36

    Side: evenly (E)


    Knit the main part of the hat in the following colors:
    (6 rounds of color A, switch to color B for 8 rounds), 3 times. Then, switch back to color A for the rest of the hat.

    First, let's make an event for the switch to color B, which we also link to the event for the ribbing. Since we want to switch to color B after 6 rounds of stockinette in color A, the switch actually happens in row 7 of the stockinette pattern and therefore, we enter 7 for In Which Row? and select the event with the note Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm) in the After Which Event? field. This is the complete input:

    Event Type: Alert

    Start: Linked? ON, "In Which Row?" 7, "After Which Event?" select the event with note "Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm)"

    Note: Switch to color B

    Since the stripe in color B is 8 rounds and the one in color A 6 rounds, we will start the stripes in color B every 14 rounds:

    Occurrence Settings:

    Every Which Row? 14

    How Many Times? 3

    Equivalently, we link the stripes in color A to the end of the ribbing:

    Event Type: Alert

    Start: Linked? ON, "In Which Row?" 15, "After Which Event?" select the event with note "Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm)"

    Note: Switch to color A

    Occurrence Settings:

    Every Which Row? 14

    How Many Times? 3

    The rest of the instructions for the hat can be input just like in Tutorial 1.


    Let me add a couple of extra remarks about linked events. If the pattern called for it, we could link another event to any of the existing linked events and create a chain of linked events. In such cases, to make it easier to spot which event is linked to which other event, the linked events appear color-coded in the List of Events on the Piece Setup screen. If there are several events that link to the same event, they will appear in the same color (the color sequence repeats after 5 colors).

    In general, you can link an event to any other event of the same piece. But you cannot create closed loops by linking events that are already directly or indirectly connected. For example, in the this tutorial's project, we could not link the Ribbing: k1, p1 until 2 in (5 cm) event to the Switch to color B event because they are already linked. To avoid such problems during the setup of linked events, JKnit automatically displays only "valid" events as candidates to link to and filters out the rest.

    Lastly, you can link blocks to other events in the same manner as explained above for events. However, at the moment, you cannot link any event (or block) to a block.